Tag Archive for: Tooth Extraction

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There is never a good time for a tooth extraction. Whether it’s your wisdom teeth or any of your other teeth, two things are certain: the procedure can be incredibly uncomfortable, sometimes painful and the recovery can be long and tedious depending on the procedure.

Aside from changes in diet, having a tooth extracted often necessitates some adjustments in lifestyle. It often means the patient has to take it slow, avoid intense physical activity and rest! The problem is, some of us have commitments — whether they may be for work or anything else — that we can’t avoid.

How safe is flying after a tooth extraction? This article will go over the risks, as well as the possible solutions, to make sure you’re safe in the air right after your tooth has been pulled.

How can a flight complicate my tooth extraction?

The extraction of a tooth has been known to result in a lingering minor pain that often requires the intake of over-the-counter painkillers. In some rare cases, it can even cause discomfort so intense that it needs a prescription to dull the pain.

A likely way this can be complicated by flying is the changes in air pressure in the cabin. These can cause sinus pressure, headaches, or even toothaches. Any of these on top of a tooth extraction can be incredibly uncomfortable, especially within the first 48 hours of the procedure.

What can I do to prepare for the pain?

The first thing you should do is to consult your dentist about flying after your tooth extraction. As a trained professional with access to your medical history, they can determine the risks more thoroughly, depending on your physiology.

A dentist is more likely to okay a flight if, for example, you only had a single tooth pulled. Any more than that (e.g. wisdom teeth extractions) might be too painful for you to handle on an aeroplane. In either eventuality, the dentist might recommend some painkillers.

Make sure to pack an appropriate amount of painkillers and to take them only as prescribed, no matter how much pain you experience. Any more could be dangerous for your health.

If you plan on eating during the flight, call your airline ahead to warn them of any specialised dietary requirements. Ensure that they only serve you soft foods and snacks, like soup, yoghurt, or smoothies (or take your own).

Other than painkillers, what else should I bring?

If you decide to fly very soon after your procedure, you might have to end up changing your gauze on the plane. Familiarise yourself with the process of changing your gauze, and make sure to clear whatever medical items and materials with your airline before your flight.

It might also help to bring an empty resealable bag or ice pack just in case the painkillers are not enough. Ask your flight attendant for some ice, and press the ice pack to your cheek for ten-minute intervals to relieve a little bit of the pain.

Conclusion

While it definitely isn’t recommended to fly within the first 48 hours of your tooth extraction procedure, it is understandable that it is sometimes unavoidable. So long as you have the permission of your dentist, and an awareness of both the risks involved and the solutions you can use to mitigate them, flying can be safe after a tooth extraction.

If you’re looking for dental treatment in Turkey, send us at WeCure a message today! Our team of experts can get you the help you need to ease your concerns.

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